Tracing / Traces: Architecture and the Archive 2019

Plan of Chicago, with rectangular communities, Ludwig Karl Hilberseimer, c. 1955 © Ryerson and Burnham Archives, The Art Institute of Chicago

 

Saturday, November 9, 2019. 11:00 am.
RSVP HERE

 

On Saturday, November 9, 2019, MAS Context is organizing the third edition of our Tracing / Traces event when readers will have the chance to get a behind-the-scenes look at selected items from the Ryerson & Burnham Archives located at the Art Institute of Chicago.

Five architects/offices will select items of the collection and discuss them in relationship to their practice, the discipline, and/or society. Nathaniel Parks, Tigerman McCurry Art and Architecture Archivist of the Ryerson & Burnham Libraries, will share the history of the same items.

 

This year’s participants include:

Kelly BairBairBalliet
Gia BiagiStudio Gang
Judith De JongDe Jong Urban Projects
Joshua G. SteinRadical Craft
Dan WheelerWheeler Kearns Architects

 

For previous editions, please visit:

Tracing / Traces: Architecture and the Archive 2018
Archive selection by Paola Aguirre (Borderless), Sarah Dunn (UrbanLab), Grant Gibson (CAMESgibson, Inc.), Geoff Goldberg (G. Goldberg + Associates), and Ellen Grimes (FlohrGrimes).

Tracing / Traces: Architecture and the Archive 2017
Archive selection by Stewart Hicks (Design With Company
Sean Lally (Sean Lally), Ann Lui and Craig Reschke (Future Firm), Margaret McCurry (Tigerman McCurry), and Alison Von Glinow and Lap Chi Kwong (Kwong Von Glinow Design).

 

The Ryerson & Burnham Archives’ collections are notably strong in late nineteenth- and twentieth-century American architecture, with particular depth in midwestern architecture. Architects such as Edward Bennett, Daniel Burnham, Bruce Goff, Bertrand Goldberg, Ludwig Hilberseimer, Mies van der Rohe, Louis Sullivan, and Frank Lloyd Wright are represented in a broad range of papers. Major architectural events, such as the World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893 in Chicago, The Century of Progress International Exposition of 1933–1934 in Chicago, and the World’s Fair of 1939 in New York, are also represented in an individual archive.

The event is free with museum admission. Please, check coats and bags before entering the library.

 

MAS Context is supported by private donations. For information about how to support MAS Context, please visit: www.mascontext.com/support

MAS Context Fall Talks 2019
Joshua G. Stein and Paulette Singley

Colonna Trajana by Giovanni Battista Piranesi, 1748 – 1751. Public domain.

 

Thursday, October 17, 2019. 6:00 pm.
RSVP HERE

 

Architect Joshua G. Stein and architectural historian Paulette Singley will lecture on Thursday, October 17, as part of MAS Context’s 2019 Fall Talks series. The lecture will take place at the Society of Architectural Historians (1365 North Astor Street, Chicago, Illinois 60610).

 

Trajan’s Hollow / How to Read Architecture

Joshua G. Stein and Paulette Singley will debate the role of historical inquiry within contemporary design practice as discussed in their recent books: Trajan’s Hollow and How to Read Architecture: An Introduction to Interpreting the Built Environment respectively. Architect Sam Jacob will be the respondent.

Trajan’s Column, which is one of the great monuments of Roman antiquity, has been obsessively documented over the centuries by historians and archaeologists, and admired by tourists and Romans alike. Trajan’s Hollow exposes, and renders material, qualities of the Column neglected amidst all this attention. Sparked by Piranesi’s renowned engravings of the Column and the perennial tension between classical geometry and picturesque ruin, Stein’s research traces―and ultimately reconstructs as architecture―the missing monument, one overlooked by these competing ideals. This book reconstitutes the chiseled, eroding interior of the Column and reclaims its progeny―casts and copies of the original produced over two thousand years. Charting the Column’s extraction and its reproduction networks from the marble quarries of Carrara to the plaster diaspora of Paris, Trajan’s Hollow proposes a new ethos of scanning and replication, saturating digital technologies with an expansive material awareness to amplify the projective capacity of historical inquiry.

How to Read Architecture is based on the fundamental premise that reading and interpreting architecture is something we already do, and that close observation matters. This book enhances this skill so that given an unfamiliar building, you will have the tools to understand it and to be inspired by it. Author Paulette Singley encourages you to misread, closely read, conventionally read, and unconventionally read architecture to stimulate your creative process.

This book explores three essential ways to help you understand architecture: reading a building from the outside-in, from the inside-out, and from the position of out-and-out, or formal, architecture. This book erodes boundaries between the frequently compartmentalized fields of interior design, landscape design, and building design with chapters exploring concepts of terroir, scenography, criticality, atmosphere, tectonics, inhabitation, type, form, and enclosure. Using examples and case studies that span a wide range of historical and global precedents, Singley addresses the complex interaction among the ways a building engages its context, addresses its performative exigencies, and operates as an autonomous aesthetic object.

 

Copies of Trajan’s Hollow and the How to Read Architecture will be available for purchase.

 

MAS Context is partially supported by private donations. For information about how to support MAS Context, please visit: www.mascontext.com/support

 

Joshua G. Stein is the founder Radical Craft and the co-director of the Data Clay Network, a forum for the exploration of digital techniques applied to ceramic materials. Radical Craft is a Los Angeles-based studio that advances an experimental design practice saturated in history, archaeology and craft. This inquiry inflects the production of urban spaces and artifacts by evolving newly grounded approaches to the challenges posed by virtuality, velocity, and globalization. Stein has received numerous grants, awards, and fellowships, including multiple grants from the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, the AIA Upjohn research award, and the 2010-11 Rome Prize Fellowship in Architecture. He is a former member of the LA Forum Board of Directors and has taught at the California College of the Arts, Cornell University, SCI-Arc, and the Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design. He is currently Professor of Architecture at Woodbury University.
www.radical-craft.com | www.data-clay.org

Paulette Singley is a widely read architectural historian and theorist whose work expands the disciplinary limits of architecture across diverse subject matter such as food, film, and fashion. She is a Professor of Architecture at Woodbury University in Los Angeles, California. She received a Ph.D. from Princeton University, an M.A. from Cornell University, and a B.Arch. from the University of Southern California. She co-edited Eating Architecture, the first book to explore the intersections of architecture and the culinary arts. She also co-edited Architecture: In Fashion and has published chapters in several anthologies as well as essays in architecture journals such as Log and Assemblage.
Paulette Singley | Woodbury University

MAS Context Fall Talks 2019
Marita Gomis

Casa Gomis, El Prat de Llobregat, 2019. © Iker Gil.

 

Monday, October 14, 2019. 6:00 pm.
RSVP COMING SOON

 

Marita Gomis, co-owner of the Casa Gomis / La Ricarda, will lecture on Monday, October 14, as part of MAS Context’s 2019 Fall Talks series. The lecture will take place at the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts (4 West Burton Place, Chicago, IL 60610).

 

La Ricarda: An Architectural and Cultural Project

During her talk, Marita Gomis will give a unique perspective on the Casa Gomis, the iconic house that she grew up in with her four sisters and her brother. She will discuss the design and construction of the house, the cultural activities it hosted, its relevance more than five decades after it was built, and the efforts (and challenges) to preserve this historic house.

La Ricarda or Casa Gomis, completed in 1963, is one of the key midcentury buildings in Spain. Located by the Mediterranean Sea in El Prat de Llobregat, a town 10 miles southwest of Barcelona, the house was commissioned by Ricardo Gomis and Inés Bertrand in 1949. Barcelona-born architect Antonio Bonet Castellana, who had trained with Le Corbusier and Josep Lluís Sert, designed the house while living in Buenos Aires, where he had emigrated from Paris after the start of the Spanish Civil War. Working closely with the clients via letters, Bonet designed every aspect of the building, from the overall organization to the materials, interior details, and furniture. The result was a spacious and harmonious house defined by an 8.8m x 8.8m grid of thin metal pillars and vaults, with connected but distinct areas for the different uses. The house was also designed with its natural surroundings in mind, blurring inside and outside, and paying special attention to the nearby pines, dunes, and water.

Besides its architectural merit, the house is also remarkable for the critical cultural role it played in Catalonia since its completion. The Gomis Bertrand family supported and welcomed to the house intellectuals and artists during Franco’s dictatorship in Spain. Organized by Club 49, a private association that promoted avant-garde cultural activities, which Ricardo Gomis belonged to, the house hosted many cultural activities, from concerts that benefited from its state-of-the-art sound system to dance performances and theater shows. It was a haven for artistic experimentation.

 

This talk accompanies the exhibition La Ricarda: An Architectural and Cultural Project organized by MAS Context and that will be on view October 12, October 19, and October 26 at Lawrence & Clark. For more information, please visit: www.mascontext.com/events/mas-context-fall-talks-2019/la-ricarda-an-architectural-and-cultural-project

 

Casa Gomis, El Prat de Llobregat, 2019. © Iker Gil.

 

Casa Gomis, El Prat de Llobregat, 2019. © Iker Gil.

 

Casa Gomis, El Prat de Llobregat, 2019. © Iker Gil.

 

Marita Gomis, along with her five siblings, is the owner of Casa Gomis, one of the key midcentury buildings in Spain and the house she grew up in. Commissioned by Ricardo Gomis and Inés Bertrand, it was designed by Antonio Bonet Castellana and completed in 1963. A haven for artistic experimentation, the house hosted many cultural activities and continues to be a must-see destination for architecture students and professionals from around the world. Marita and the rest of the Gomis Bertrand family has diligently preserved it in its original state with the help of local architects Fernando Álvarez and Jordi Roig.

La Ricarda:
An Architectural and Cultural Project

Casa Gomis, El Prat de Llobregat, 2015. © Adrià Goula.

 

MAS Context presents the exhibition La Ricarda: An Architectural and Cultural Project. The exhibition will be on display October 12, October 19, and October 26, 2019, at Lawrence & Clark (4755 N. Clark St. Chicago 60640, USA).

 

About the exhibition

La Ricarda or Casa Gomis, completed in 1963, is one of the key midcentury buildings in Spain. Located by the Mediterranean Sea in El Prat de Llobregat, a town 10 miles southwest of Barcelona, the house was commissioned by Ricardo Gomis and Inés Bertrand in 1949. Barcelona-born architect Antonio Bonet Castellana, who had trained with Le Corbusier and Josep Lluís Sert, designed the house while living in Buenos Aires, where he had emigrated from Paris after the start of the Spanish Civil War. Working closely with the clients via letters, Bonet designed every aspect of the building, from the overall organization to the materials, interior details, and furniture. The result was a spacious and harmonious house defined by an 8.8m x 8.8m grid of thin metal pillars and vaults, with connected but distinct areas for the different uses. The house was also designed with its natural surroundings in mind, blurring inside and outside, and paying special attention to the nearby pines, dunes, and water.

Besides its architectural merit, the house is also remarkable for the critical cultural role it played in Catalonia since its completion. The Gomis Bertrand family supported and welcomed to the house intellectuals and artists during Franco’s dictatorship in Spain. Organized by Club 49, a private association that promoted avant-garde cultural activities, which Ricardo Gomis belonged to, the house hosted many cultural activities, from concerts that benefited from its state-of-the-art sound system to dance performances and theater shows. It was a haven for artistic experimentation.

Today, the house is still owned by the Gomis Bertrand family who has diligently preserved it in its original state, including its furniture, with the help of local architects Fernando Álvarez and Jordi Roig. Seventy years after it was commissioned, the house continues to be a must-see destination for architecture students and professionals from around the world. However, the future of Casa Gomis is uncertain. The passage of time, the humid climate and proximity to the sea, as well as the nearby Barcelona airport (its third runway is less than 1,500 feet away) put into question its long-term future. Now is the time to define the legal framework and secure the funds to ensure the maintenance and conservation of a key architectural and cultural project.

Through photographs—historic and current—as well as drawings, this exhibition, curated by Iker Gil, will convey the design and construction of the house, the cultural activities it hosted, its relevance more than five decades after it was built, and the efforts (and challenges) to preserve this historic house.

 

Besides attending the opening of the exhibition on Saturday, October 12, Marita Gomis, one of the six siblings who grew up in Casa Gomis, will give a public lecture on Monday, October 14:

 

October 14 at 6:00 pm at the Graham Foundation (MORE INFO)
4 W Burton Pl, Chicago, IL 60610
Open to the public

 

La Ricarda: An Architectural and Cultural Project has been generously supported by Chuck Thurow, and is a partner program of the 2019 Chicago Architecture Biennial.

 

About Lawrence & Clark
Lawrence & Clark is a collection-based gallery run by Jason Pickleman. The collection spans more than 1000 works in all media. The storefront gallery is an opportunity to exhibit privately held artwork in a public setting. The gallery is open every Saturday from 1pm until 5pm and by appointment. For more information, please visit: lawrenceandclark.com.

 

Casa Gomis, El Prat de Llobregat, 2015. © Adrià Goula

 

Casa Gomis, El Prat de Llobregat, 2015. © Adrià Goula

Geometry of Light
Farnsworth House

Geometry of Light press preview, Farnsworth House, 2019 © Chris Bellezza

 

MAS Context, the Farnsworth House, and the National Trust for Historic Preservation are organizing Geometry of Light, an art intervention by Luftwerk in collaboration with Iker Gil, that will be installed at the Farnsworth House in Plano, Illinois, in October 11-13, 2019. The art installation will coincide with the third edition of the Chicago Architecture Biennial. Both VIP and general entry tickets are already available for purchase. Geometry of Light will run each evening from 7 pm until 10 pm.

 

Tickets
Friday, October 11, 2019 (VIP)
7:00 PM | $75 | Virtue Cider, hors d’oeuvres, & shuttle service to/from Aurora Metra station included in ticket price.

Saturday, October 12, 2019
7:00 PM | $35 | Shuttle service to/from Aurora Metra station available for additional fee

Sunday, October 13, 2019
7:00 PM | $35 | Shuttle service to/from Aurora Metra station available for additional fee

 

Geometry of Light is a three-night light and sound art installation in the iconic Farnsworth House, designed by Mies van der Rohe, and on the surrounding land. Completed in 1951 and opened to the public in 2004, the Farnsworth House was the weekend home of Chicago research physician Dr. Edith Farnsworth. This outdoor intervention will uncover the forgotten history of the site and remnants of earlier landscape by revealing the underlying geometries that relate the world-renowned house to its river floodplain, site topography, and key trees that no longer exist.

In concert with the projected light, a custom-designed sound piece by Oriol Tarragó is integral to this experience. Developed in direct response to the site, this auditory component uses the pitch of the space to create a tonal reading. Together these elements provide a new interpretation of the Farnsworth House and its extraordinary location.

 

Geometry of Light premiered this past February at the German Pavilion in Barcelona designed by Mies van der Rohe and Lilly Reich. The installation was presented as part of the Fundació Mies van der Rohe’s ongoing program of artistic interventions also corresponding with the LLUM BCN Festival and the Santa Eulàlia Festival.

 

Geometry of Light is part of the Year of German-American Friendship 2018|19 initiated by the German Federal Foreign Office, the Goethe-Institut, and is supported by the Federation of German Industries (BDI). This project is generously supported by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts and Bosch Power Tools – North America. Additional support provided by Chuck Thurow, Virtue Cider, and many individual donors.

 

Project organized by
MAS Context
Farnsworth House
National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Leading institutional support by
Wunderbar Together
German Federal Foreign Office
Goethe-Institut
Federation of German Industries (BDI)
Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts
Bosch Power Tools – North America

 

The leading individual support is provided by Chuck Thurow.

 

The project is also supported by:
Paola Aguirre
Leslie Bodenstein
Will Forrest
Joanne Gross
Tom Lee
Ann Lui
Jason Pickleman
Craig Reschke
Tom Rossiter
Virtue Cider

 

Project identity by Normal.

 

Luftwerk is the artistic vision of Petra Bachmaier and Sean Gallero. Luftwerk’s art practice focuses on the exploration of what makes a space a place and how art plays a vital role within urban and natural environments. With each individual project, Luftwerk discovers and accentuates the unique connections between architecture, environment and the communities, which interact within these places, transforming their experiences of space and site through light and sound.
www.luftwerk.net | @_luftwerk

Iker Gil is an architect, urban designer, and director of MAS Studio. In addition, he is the editor in chief of MAS Context. He is the editor of the book Shanghai Transforming (ACTAR, 2008) and was the associate curator of the U.S. Pavilion at the 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale. He is the recipient of the 2010 Emerging Visions Award from the Chicago Architectural Club and has been recognized as one of “Fifty Under Fifty: Innovators of the 21st Century” by a jury composed by Stanley Tigerman, Jeanne Gang, Qingyun Ma, and Marion Weiss.
www.mas-studio.com | @MASContext

Nocturnal Landscapes:
Urban Flows of Global Metropolises
exhibition opening

Shibuya Street, Tokyo, Japan, 2014. © David Schalliol

 

Wednesday, September 25, 2019. 6:00 pm.
Instituto Cervantes of Chicago
31 W Ohio St, Chicago, IL 60654, USA

RSVP INFO COMING SOON

 

On Wednesday, September 25, 2019, MAS Context and the Instituto Cervantes of Chicago are organizing the exhibition opening of Nocturnal Landscapes: Urban Flows of Global Metropolises.

Barcelona-based architects Mar Santamaria Varas and Pablo Martínez of 300.000 km/s, and Minneapolis-based photographer/sociologist David Schalliol will discuss their individual work around global metropolis and present a selection of their work that will be exhibited in Nocturnal Landscapes: Urban Flows of Global Metropolises. They will discuss the use of cartography and photography in revealing hidden aspects of global metropoles. Iker Gil, curator of the exhibition, will introduce and moderate the event.

The exhibition Nocturnal Landscapes: Urban Flows of Global Metropolises, organized by MAS Context and the Instituto Cervantes of Chicago, will be on display at the Instituto Cervantes from September 17, 2019 until October 30, 2019. The exhibition, curated by Iker Gil, is a partner program of the 2019 Chicago Architecture Biennial.

 

Nocturnal Landscapes is partially supported by Simon with printing support by HP.

 

 

MAS Context is supported by private donations. For information about how to support MAS Context, please visit: www.mascontext.com/support

 

Mar Santamaria and Pablo Martinez operate 300.00Km/s, a professional firm based in Barcelona that provides data analysis and consulting on cities. They apply technology to architecture, cities and land, searching for new ways to transform the environment. They work in the field of urban analysis, cartography, urban planning, digital tool development, and digital humanities. Their knowledge stems from architecture, urbanism, geographic data analysis, urban history, restoration, museology, industrial design, project management and software development. They provide data analysis services and data products to help cities make better decisions based on data. They have collaborated successfully with public entities, international companies, and cultural institutions.
www.300000kms.net | @300000kms

David Schalliol is an assistant sociology professor at St. Olaf College and director of Scrappers Film Group. Schalliol is interested in the relationship between community and space. His writing and photography have appeared in publications like Social Science Research, MAS Context, and The New York Times, as well as numerous exhibitions, including the Chicago Architecture Biennial in 2015 and 2017, the Belfast Photography Festival, and the Midwest Photographers Project of the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago. Schalliol is the author of Isolated Building Studies, and regularly contributes to documentaries, including Almost There and Highrise: Out My Window, an interactive documentary that won the 2011 International Digital Emmy award for non-fiction. He made his directorial debut with The Area, which screened in the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival in April 2018.
www.davidschalliol.com | @metroblossom

Iker Gil is an architect, urban designer, and director of MAS Studio. In addition, he is the editor in chief of MAS Context. He is the editor of the book Shanghai Transforming (ACTAR, 2008) and has curated several exhibitions, including “BOLD: Alternative Scenarios for Chicago” as part of the inaugural Chicago Architecture Biennial. He is the recipient of the 2010 Emerging Visions Award from the Chicago Architectural Club and has been recognized as one of “Fifty Under Fifty: Innovators of the 21st Century” by a jury composed by Stanley Tigerman, Jeanne Gang, Qingyun Ma, and Marion Weiss.
www.mas-studio.com | @MASContext

Nocturnal Landscapes:
Urban Flows of Global Metropolises

Paris. © 300.000Km/s

 

MAS Context and the Instituto Cervantes of Chicago present the exhibition Nocturnal Landscapes: Urban Flows of Global Metropolises.

 

The exhibition will be on display from September 17 until October 30, 2019, at the Instituto Cervantes of Chicago (31 W Ohio St, Chicago, IL 60654, USA).

 

About the exhibition

The exhibition Nocturnal Landscapes: Urban Flows of Global Metropolises, organized by MAS Context and the Instituto Cervantes of Chicago, explores new political, economic, environmental, and social challenges that affect global cities at night. Currently, in the context of urban growth, there is a need to observe and analyze cities at night from an interdisciplinary perspective.

This exhibit presents a research methodology focused on the comparison of relevant case studies based on cartographic depictions of the rhythms and recognizable sites of seven global cities using Knowledge Discovery in Databases (KDD) data and tools. The exhibition also includes a collection of photographs of cities around the world providing a snapshot of their activities at night. Chicago, Barcelona, and Vancouver will be the focus of a more detailed exploration.

The exhibition is curated and designed by architect Iker Gil (MAS Studio, Chicago) and features work by architects Mar Santamaria and Pablo Martinez (300.000 Km/s, Barcelona) and sociologist/photographer David Schalliol (David Schalliol, Minneapolis).

This exhibition is a partner program of the 2019 Chicago Architecture Biennial.

 

Nocturnal Landscapes is partially supported by Simon with printing support by HP.

 

 

The exhibition will be accompanied by two talks by Mar Santamaria, Pablo Martinez, and David Schalliol in Barcelona and Chicago:

 

August 27 at 7:00 pm at Espai Serrahima in Barcelona (MORE INFO)
Carrer Mèxic 3-17, 08004, Barcelona
Open to the public

September 25 at 6:00 pm at the Instituto Cervantes of Chicago (MORE INFO)
31 W Ohio St, Chicago, IL 60654, USA
Open to the public

 

Mar Santamaria and Pablo Martinez operate 300.00Km/s, a professional firm based in Barcelona that provides data analysis and consulting on cities. They apply technology to architecture, cities and land, searching for new ways to transform the environment. They work in the field of urban analysis, cartography, urban planning, digital tool development, and digital humanities. Their knowledge stems from architecture, urbanism, geographic data analysis, urban history, restoration, museology, industrial design, project management and software development. They provide data analysis services and data products to help cities make better decisions based on data. They have collaborated successfully with public entities, international companies, and cultural institutions.
www.300000kms.net | @300000kms

David Schalliol is an assistant sociology professor at St. Olaf College and director of Scrappers Film Group. Schalliol is interested in the relationship between community and space. His writing and photography have appeared in publications like Social Science Research, MAS Context, and The New York Times, as well as numerous exhibitions, including the Chicago Architecture Biennial in 2015 and 2017, the Belfast Photography Festival, and the Midwest Photographers Project of the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago. Schalliol is the author of Isolated Building Studies, and regularly contributes to documentaries, including Almost There and Highrise: Out My Window, an interactive documentary that won the 2011 International Digital Emmy award for non-fiction. He made his directorial debut with The Area, which screened in the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival in April 2018.
www.davidschalliol.com | @metroblossom

 

Exhibition credits

Participants: 300.000 Km/s and David Schalliol
Organizing institutions: Instituto Cervantes of Chicago and MAS Context
Curator: Iker Gil / MAS Studio
Design: Iker Gil / MAS Studio

MAS Context Spring Talks 2019
Cartography and Photography
Revealing Global Metropolises

Day and night activities in Barcelona. © 300.000 km/s

 

Tuesday, August 27, 2019. 7:00 pm.
RSVP HERE

 

On Tuesday, August 27, 2019, MAS Context and 300.000 km/s are organizing an event in Barcelona to talk about the use of cartography and photography in revealing hidden aspects of global metropoles. The presentation will emphasize the work done around the nocturnal conditions of those cities. The event will take place at Espai Serrahima (Carrer Mèxic 3-17, 08004, Barcelona).

 

Barcelona-based architects Mar Santamaria Varas and Pablo Martínez of 300.000 km/s, and Minneapolis-based photographer/sociologist David Schalliol will discuss their individual work around global metropolis and present a selection of their work that will be exhibited in Nocturnal Landscapes: Urban Flows of Global Metropolises. This event will be in Spanish and English.

The exhibition Nocturnal Landscapes: Urban Flows of Global Metropolises, organized by MAS Context and the Instituto Cervantes of Chicago, will be on display at the Instituto Cervantes from September 17, 2019 until October 30, 2019. The exhibition, curated by Iker Gil, is a partner program of the 2019 Chicago Architecture Biennial.

 

Nocturnal Landscapes is partially supported by Simon with printing support by HP.

 

 

About the participants:

Mar Santamaria and Pablo Martinez operate 300.00Km/s, a professional firm based in Barcelona that provides data analysis and consulting on cities. They apply technology to architecture, cities and land, searching for new ways to transform the environment. They work in the field of urban analysis, cartography, urban planning, digital tool development, and digital humanities. Their knowledge stems from architecture, urbanism, geographic data analysis, urban history, restoration, museology, industrial design, project management and software development. They provide data analysis services and data products to help cities make better decisions based on data. They have collaborated successfully with public entities, international companies, and cultural institutions.
www.300000kms.net | @300000kms

David Schalliol is an assistant sociology professor at St. Olaf College and director of Scrappers Film Group. Schalliol is interested in the relationship between community and space. His writing and photography have appeared in publications like Social Science Research, MAS Context, and The New York Times, as well as numerous exhibitions, including the Chicago Architecture Biennial in 2015 and 2017, the Belfast Photography Festival, and the Midwest Photographers Project of the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago. Schalliol is the author of Isolated Building Studies, and regularly contributes to documentaries, including Almost There and Highrise: Out My Window, an interactive documentary that won the 2011 International Digital Emmy award for non-fiction. He made his directorial debut with The Area, which screened in the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival in April 2018.
www.davidschalliol.com | @metroblossom

 

Scrapping a Half-Demolished Mansion, Dubai, United Arab Emirates, 2016. © David Schalliol.

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