Vigilantism is the topic of Issue 33 of MAS Context

Liberatory Vigilante. © Photo by Blair Reid. Courtesy of the authors.

 

Our next issue will explore spaces of vigilantism, both historically and today. What are the spatial dimensions of vigilante encounters, segregation, violence, and exclusion, or conversely emancipation, liberation, and inclusion? Threshold, circulation, private vs. public, and other architectural delineations of space have become the subject of much controversy as footage of sexist and racist policing of these spaces emerge. Beyond spatial dimensions, which regulatory, institutional, aesthetic, and material expressions of vigilantism does architecture condition? What is vigilante behavior in highly digital and post-digital space? In pop-culture? In new media? How do technology and design become means for cultivating and expressing those behaviors? How do contentious political movements respond to, and draw from, vigilantism? What are the micro-, meso-, and macro-level dynamics of sociospatial acts of violence? Can vigilantism ever be good? Liberatory? And what are ways aggressors, resistors, and witnesses take on characteristics of vigilantes? To address these issues and more, vigilantism is a topic that needs to be explored.

The Vigilantism issue will be guest edited by Germane Barnes and Shawhin Roudbari.

 

(Left) Germane Barnes; (Right) Shawhin Roudbari.

 

About the guest editors

Germane Barnes is an Assistant Professor and the Director of The Community, Housing & Identity Lab (CHIL) at the University of Miami. He is also the Director of Studio Barnes, a research and design practice that investigates the connection between architecture and identity. Mining architecture’s social and political agency, he examines how the built environment influences black domesticity. His design and research contributions have been published and exhibited in several international institutions. Most notably, The Museum of Modern Art, The Graham Foundation, The New York Times, Architect Magazine, DesignMIAMI/ Art Basel, The Swiss Institute, Metropolis Magazine, Curbed, and The National Museum of African American History where he was identified as one of the future designers on the rise.
www.germanebarnes.com | @UncleRemusChkn

Shawhin Roudbari is an assistant professor in Environmental Design at the University of Colorado Boulder. In his research, Shawhin studies ways designers organize to address social problems. He bridges sociological studies of social movements and race with architectural theory. Shawhin is a founding member of the Spatial Justice Design Collective, which uses design and theory building to investigate how dissent and counter-hegemonic tactics play out in urban landscapes. His work contributes to theories of contentious politics in the spatial professions and employs ethnographic methods.
www.dissentxdesign.com | @dissentXdesign

White hegemony. © Collage by Ana Colon Quiñones. Courtesy of the authors.

 



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